Here's Our Thanksgiving Tree of Thanks - What We're Thankful for This Year

Every year, we observe the thanksgiving holiday to celebrate the multitude of blessings that we have received, the love that we share with family, and all the things that we have come to experience, positive or otherwise. You see, I believe that if you learn something from your experiences, then there’s no such thing as a bad experience.

So what are you thankful for this year? How can you share that gratitude in an artistic and fun way this coming thanksgiving holiday?

We all know that thanksgiving holidays—and thanksgiving dinners in particular—often double as a small family reunion. It’s the time of year when family members working out of state and overseas come home to celebrate the holiday with love ones.

So how do you make this year’s thanksgiving celebration more memorable and intimate? By creating a thanksgiving tree of thanks, otherwise known as the thankful tree. It’s a simple concept every family member can enjoy and take part in. And here is how you make it.

Creating the Thanksgiving Tree of Thanks in a Few Easy Steps

Before we begin, here is a list of the materials that you will need to complete this fun family project:

  • Gel pens, markers, crayons, and colored pencils for writing
  • Colored cardboard paper
  • A pair of scissors
  • Hole punch
  • Spools of twine in various colors
  • Dried up tree branches
  • A tall, sturdy pot or vase
  • Zip ties or colored floral tape
  • Spray paint (optional)

So, to make this thankful tree, the first thing you should do is find two to three dried up branches in your yard, about two or three feet tall and around an inch in diameter at the base of the branch. If you have trees in your property, then this shouldn’t be a problem. However, if you can’t find the right branches, you can use two bunches of curly willow instead.

Bunch the two or three dried up tree branches together and hold them in place using zip ties or colored floral tape. Make sure that the branches are arranged so that they resemble a tree.

Next, find a tall, sturdy pot or vase to house the thankful tree. You can use stones or pebbles to hold the tree in place at the center of the vase. Or, you can use packing peanuts; just make sure to pack them tightly to hold the tree in place. It’s important that the tree is not too tall that it will easily topple over at the slightest movement.

Before you put the tree inside the vase or pot, you can paint the entire tree using spray paint to give it a nice colorful touch. As for the color, I leave that choice to you. The spray paint should also cover up the zip ties you used to hold the branches together.

Creating the Leaves for Your Thankful Tree

As for the leaves, where you and the guests of your thanksgiving party will write their thankful messages, use colored cardboard paper. A few sheets of cardboard paper of at least three different earth-tone colors should suffice.

Using a pencil, draw or trace leaf shapes on the cardboard paper. Make it big enough so that guests can write their messages well, but not too big that it won’t look good hanging on your thankful tree. Use a pair of scissors to cut out the leaf patterns from the cardboard paper.

Using the hole puncher, create a hole at the base of each leaf cut out. Then, thread a 3-inch string or twine through the hole of each leaf and tie both ends together to make a loop. Now, you have a leaf made of cardboard paper for the guests to write on and the means to hang the leaves on the thanksgiving tree.

All you have to do now is find an appropriate place in your home for the thankful tree and provide your guests with pens, crayons, or colored pencils, and a leaf for their thankful messages.

If the Tree in Your Yard Can Speak – What Would It Be Thankful For?

Since we’re talking about thankful trees, here are a few thankful messages your tree would probably tell you if it could talk.

  • I’m thankful for the sun that gives me the energy I need to grow.
  • I’m thankful for the rain that keeps me healthy and well-hydrated.
  • I’m thankful for the nutrient-rich soil in which I stand on.
  • I’m thankful for the kids that play under the shade I provide.
  • Most importantly, I’m thankful for the homeowner who takes care of my needs, helps me through the challenges I face each and every season.

Happy Thanksgiving!

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